Bridge Cables 17-5: Innovative Policing, AI and Innovation Heats Up!

Lately, Madery Bridge writing has appeared in other places. Take a look!:

“Innovative Policing: Saves Time and Money”
“Police forces often face budget challenges and time crunches – little money and more work than time allows. In this environment, technological innovations can come slowly, expensive, difficult to deploy and integrate. The challenges for police are not much different than the challenges most people face. With lack of time and stretched resources, even important, unexpected or non-routine tasks become hard to complete. In Texas there is innovation, in law and in technology, to help both the police and the public…”
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“An (Artificially) Intelligent Future for California?”
“Californians harboring dystopian fears would have us believe that the state is sowing the seeds of its own destruction by leading in the development of artificial intelligence. Consider state legislation introduced this year that would fine companies like Uber $25,000 a day per vehicle if they operate self-driving cars without a permit. They are wrong and the future is not a scary place…”
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“Innovation Heats Up! And You Can Be Part of It”
“Of the many promises of innovation, no promise likely rises higher than the opportunity to live longer, healthier and more active lives. While advances in entertainment and consumer electronics tend to catch our attention and seem to improve some aspects of our lives almost immediately, advances in health care can often seem remote and harder to grasp. But now and then an advance comes along that is completely obvious in its benefit…”
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Bridge Cables 17-4: FCC Coalition Comments, Innovation in Transportation & Getting to the Near Future

Lately, Madery Bridge writing has appeared in other places. Take a look!:

Ad Hoc FCC coalition – filing of comments
“We, the undersigned organizations, represent millions of Americans concerned about the overreach of the Federal government. We write to voice our support for returning the Internet to the light touch regulatory approach that allowed the Internet to take off. There was a bipartisan ‘Hands off the Net!’ consensus championed by both former President Bill Clinton and former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, and by other leading members of both parties – until the FCC made two sweeping claims of power over the Internet in the name of protecting ‘net neutrality'”
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“Considering an Innovative Change in Transportation Infrastructure”
“We live in an age of unparalleled innovation, with innovation affecting all we do and how we do it. But at the forefront of innovation news, and capturing the imagination of the public, is innovation in transportation. From changes in business and industry processes like Uber, to changes in hardware for partial to fully automated vehicles, the world of the automobile is in rapid transition. However, exciting innovation in transportation is not limited to automobiles…”
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“Getting to the Near Future, and Beyond”
“The promise of the world of tomorrow is just an empty promise long held out as being made good. But now we really do stand on the precipice of the future. We can peer into the near future with clarity, optimism and certainty. Everything we know today will change, be reimagined and be used in new ways with greater access. From work to play, powerful networks and new tech applications will be the foundation for the next generation of services. How so? Take a look…”
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Bridge Span 17-9: Statement on Restoring Internet Freedom Order

The FCC draft Restoring Internet Freedom Order released this week is exactly the step needed to place the internet back on the path that it had been on for decades, a path that benefits all consumers. The Order ends the government control adventurism of the previous administration by allowing consumers to take charge of their online experience, and shunning government control of user’s communications. In addition, adoption of this order will bring back the balance of light touch regulation intended by the 1996 Telecommunications Act that created an environment of internet freedom encouraging billions of dollars in private investment in broadband facilities. Billions more in new investment will now follow to the benefit of all consumers.

And, as importantly, given that the internet is by its very nature interstate, the Commission should take action to implement a national policy framework for internet services to ensure uniformity across the country. By design, only through the power of the states was a federal government formed. State control is paramount. However, there is also a clear role for the federal government as the Founding Father’s envisioned. Without clear FCC action to implement a national framework, the states are poised to carve up the internet into a series of systems, each regulated in its own way, ultimately creating a patchwork quilt that is antithetical to the very nature of the interest we understand. Plus, such radical uncertainty is the bane of investment and particularly of short and long-term capital expenditure. Today’s article in Morning Consult explains further.

For the first time all of those interested in the issue can review the draft order, being released weeks before the vote instead of kept in secret and sprung upon the commissioners in the minority and the American people. The vote in December will surely right the wrong done to the internet ecosystem for the last several years, and it comes none too soon. In the communications policy space there is much to be thankful for this year.